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Metrics in Motion: Flicker and Glare

Thursday, March 7, 2019 (12:00 PM-1:00 PM)

Metrics in Motion: Flicker and Glare
Presenter: Naomi Miller, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
March 7, 2019
Flicker and glare are visual phenomena that have several things in common: both can range from mildly annoying to seriously disabling, both can be made worse by poorly designed LED lighting and better by good LED lighting, and both are the subject of research by PNNL that is helping to further industry standard metrics, methods of measurement, and recommended practice. This webinar will provide an up-to-date evaluation of progress in addressing these critical lighting quality factors, their implications for energy-efficient LED lighting, and where additional research is needed.
Naomi Miller has been a Senior Lighting Research Scientist since joining PNNL in 2009. Naomi's work focuses on bridging the knowledge gap between technology and application. She works with clients and stakeholders to overcome the hurdles facing the adoption of energy-efficient lighting products. Her research also focuses on lighting quality and the human impacts of light. Previously, Naomi was the Principal of Naomi Miller Lighting Design in Troy, New York. With over 30 architectural lighting design awards, Naomi is a nationally recognized expert in the field of lighting. She chaired the IES Quality of the Visual Environment committee for 8 years and was a principal member of the writing team for the IES's Light + Design: A Guide to Designing Quality Lighting for People and Buildings. She currently serves on the IES Board of Directors and is a Fellow of both the IES and IALD.learn more...

A Machine for Light- The Building as Luminaire

Thursday, March 14, 2019 (12:00 PM-1:00 PM)

What if a primary purpose of architecture is to deliver light? An examination of historical building practice answers this question in fascinating ways. A careful examination of the specific geometric properties of both building enclosures and luminaires shows striking similarities at different scales: forms that are effective in reflecting amplifying and mitigating daylight are also effective with electric light. A whole building approach to lighting, using available daylight first, then supplementing it with electric light, provides a better approach to balancing light sources.

As a "service" provided by buildings, light has a primary role, often determining or significantly impacting building siting, massing, fenestration, materials, height, and structural systems, as well as interior surfaces and colors. History provides many examples of effective strategies for maximizing daylight (and firelight) that evolved over millennia in a wide variety of cultures and climates. This webinar will demonstrate how light remains a driving force in architecture, and how lighting designers and architects can collaborate to create better lighting and better buildings.

Webinar participants are eligible for one (1) IES Continuing Education Unit (CEU).

Date of Webinar: 3/14/2019 12:00 PM Eastern Timelearn more...

Metrics in Motion: Lumen Equivalency

Tuesday, April 2, 2019 (12:00 PM-1:00 PM)

Metrics in Motion: Lumen Equivalency
Presenter: Michael Myer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
April 2, 2019
High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting has been a staple in street/area lighting as well as high bay/warehouse lighting for more than 50 years. As LED lighting displaces HID sources in these applications, many end users seek guidance about specifying LED products. Municipalities, energy efficiency groups, and manufacturers often provide look-up tables specifying HID lamp type, HID lamp wattage, and the suggested LED streetlight fixture lumen output. These values differ significantly among the different look-up tables even for the same HID lamp type and wattage. This webinar will provide an overview of a methodology for determining LED streetlight lumens for new fixtures, along with a review of comparative light loss factors and other considerations for HID and LED sources. The webinar will also review similar considerations for high-bay applications, and briefly touch on LED replacement lamps for HID lamps.
Michael Myer has been with PNNL just under 11 years. Prior to joining PNNL, Michael worked as an architectural lighting designer in New York. Michael became an architectural lighting designer after completing his M.S. in Lighting from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his B.A. in Theatre from Arizona State University. Since joining PNNL, Michael has worked on a wide-ranging number of lighting projects, field evaluations, and demonstrations for a variety of DOE programs including Building Energy Codes and Federal Appliance Standards, Commercial Building Integration, and Advanced Lighting/Solid-State Lighting.learn more...

Networked Lighting Controls

Thursday, April 18, 2019 (12:00 PM-1:00 PM)

NETWORKED LIGHTING CONTROLS

Networked lighting controls promise significant energy cost savings and other robust capabilities, such as the ability to collect data and participate in the Internet of Things. Developed by the Lighting Controls Association and presented by lighting educator Steve Mesh, this webinar introduces networked control, typical energy savings, capabilities, types of systems, system elements, the potential for rebates, and a product comparison resource. It then discusses specification issues such as wired versus wireless, topology, cybersecurity, protocols, measuring & monitoring, and integration with other systems.



Webinar participants are eligible for one (1) IES Continuing Education Unit (CEU).


Date of Webinar: 4/18/2019 12:00 PM Eastern Timelearn more...

Metrics in Motion: Connected Lighting

Thursday, May 2, 2019 (12:00 PM-1:00 PM)

Metrics in Motion: Connected Lighting
Presenter: Michael Poplawski, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
May 2, 2019
The combination of high-efficiency LED technology with seamless control and new features enabled by network connectivity presents a compelling vision for the future of lighting. Much work remains to translate that vision into successful installations, value-added functionality, and proven benefits, including energy efficiency. PNNL researchers are engaged in multiple studies designed to understand and quantify the performance of emerging connected lighting systems. In particular, the ability to measure energy performance at the device and system level is an important focus. This webinar will address some of the questions being pursued in this area, such as how to evaluate the accuracy of energy and electrical data that can be reported by connected lighting systems, and how and where to measure energy use in systems that are capable of essentially continuous change, tuning, and adaptation.
Michael Poplawski joined PNNL in 2009 as a Senior Engineer following twelve years in the commercial semiconductor industry. His work experience includes stints with Motorola, ON Semiconductor, and a CMOS image sensor start-up, and in various functions including device engineering and reliability, circuit design, application support, and technical marketing. His current efforts focus on supporting the DOE Solid-State Lighting program, primarily in the areas of Connected Lighting System technology evaluation and demonstration, standards and specification development, and the estimation of lighting energy end-use consumption. Michael is a member of IES, IEEE, and ASHRAE; serves on multiple standards development committees; and consults with numerous energy efficiency organizations, specification bodies, and early adopters.learn more...

Metrics in Motion: Color Metrics

Thursday, June 6, 2019 (12:00 PM-1:00 PM)

Metrics in Motion: Color Metrics

Presenter: Michael Royer, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

June 6, 2019

After decades of debate and living with limitation, new color metrics for both color rendition and chromaticity have been standardized by the IES and/or CIE. While science has advanced, the practice has been slower to evolve. This webinar will look at recent developments and how they might change lighting practice over the next 10 years. It will demonstrate how all constituents in the lighting community can benefit from using metrics that fit the capabilities of today’s lighting technologies. Manufacturers can more effectively evaluate performance tradeoffs and communicate product performance, allowing differentiation with novel products; specifiers can reduce uncertainty and avoid unsightly consequences, and researchers can use improved methods to investigate fundamental lighting science challenges.

Michael Royer is a senior engineer at PNNL where he works on the DOE Solid-State Lighting program. He focuses on technology development issues, helping to improve product performance through research, testing, metric development, and engagement with various elements of the lighting industry. Michael is a member of the IES Color and Technical Procedures Committees and was chair of the IES Color Metrics Task Group. Prior to joining PNNL, Michael earned a Ph.D. in Architectural Engineering from Penn State University, receiving the 2013 Taylor Technical Talent Award from the IES for his published work. Michael was named a future leader of lighting by LD+A Magazine in 2010 and has authored over 50 journal articles and government reports.learn more...

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